Thursday August 16th, 2018
at 7:00 pm

Open Rehearsal
Chandler Music Hall
Admission: Free

Saturday August 18th, 2018
at 7:30 pm

Mozart, Washut and Vaughan Williams
Chandler Music Hall
Buy Tickets

Sunday August 19th, 2018
at 11:00 am

8th Annual Breakfast with Bach/Baroque Brunch
W.F. and J.S. Bach and Handel
Breakfast at 11:00 am
in the Esther Mesh Room,
Chandler's Upper Gallery
Admission at the door: $8:00
Concert at 12:30 pm in Bethany Church
Admission at the door: Goodwill offering
Food provided by
Three Bean Cafe of Randolph


Wednesday, August 22nd, 2018
at 7:00 pm

Piano Masterclass with Annemieke McLane
Admission: Free

Thursday August 23rd, 2018
at 7:00 pm

Open Rehearsal
Chandler Music Hall
Admission: Free

Friday August 24th, 2018
at 7:00 pm

Friday Night in the Gallery
a new approach to a festival event

Solo Piano Recital by
Vermont Artist, Annemieke McLane
Garden Tour
Chandler Music Hall's
Downstairs Gallery
Admission: Free/Goodwill offering

Saturday August 25th, 2018
at 10:30 am

A Special Concert for Kids
Listen Up! Festival Artists will perform some music from the concert that evening and the kids in attendance will be asked to draw and/or write about the music they are hearing
Chandler Music Hall
Admission at the door: $6.00

Saturday August 25th, 2018
at 7:30 pm

Beethoven, Klein and Dvořák
Chandler Music Hall
Buy Tickets

Sunday August 26th, 2018
at 4:00 pm

An Encore Performance
Afternoon concert in Woodstock, VT
Beethoven, Klein and Dvořák





The Central Vermont Chamber Music Festival announces the release of its first highlight CD: Festival Harvest

"The Central Vermont Chamber Music Festival has come a long way since it was founded in 1993 by Peter Sanders, a New York cellist who grew up spending his summers in the Randolph area. An indication of just how far is its excellent New CD, "Festival Harvest," a compilation of live performances of works by Mendelssohn, Schönberg and Frank Bridge at the Chandler Music Hall in 2000 and 2004.

When I first heard the album, I had recently heard an excellent performance of Mendelssohn's A Major String Quintet at Vermont's justly revered Marlboro Music Festival. The same work opens this CD, and I actually preferred the Randolph performance. That's big praise."

Read the review from the December 2, 2005 issue of Vermont's Times Argus



Welcome to the 27th season of the CVCMF, celebrating World-class Music in the Heart of Vermont. Dates will be August 12th - 25th, 2019. We are excited to share with you some information about the performances coming in 2019 -

A Season of Standards!

More details will be posted on this website and via Facebook in the near future. I look forward to seeing you at the concerts and events and please, do bring a friend...

2019's first week will include Viola Quintets by Mendelssohn and Brahms. Also included will be a wonderful arrangement for String Quartet by Ernest H. Sanders of an anonymous 13th century vocal work.

Mendelssohn Quintet in B-flat, Op. 87
Ave Maria (arr. By Ernest H. Sanders)
Brahms Quintet #1 in F, Op. 88

The first week will feature our visit with Walter Parker at Vermont Public Radio, our collaboration with the Vermont Youth Orchestra for our 9th Breakfast with Bach and, our weekly Open Rehearsal.

Artists for week will be Violinists: Basia Danilow, Joanna Maurer, Violists: Michael Roth, Katarzyna Bryla-Weiss and Cellist: Peter Sanders.

Week two will include an all Beethoven program - a Violin Sonata, Cello Sonata and Piano Trio. Spanning the composers life from early to middle to late. This program will be performed BOTH in Chandler and in Woodstock, VT.

Artists for this week will be Violinist: Arturo Delmoni, Cellist: Peter Sanders and Pianist: Adrienne Kim.

Sonata for Violin and Piano #5 in F, Op. 24 "Spring"
Sonata for Cello and Piano #5 in D, Op. 102, #2
Piano Trio in D, Op. 70, #1 "Ghost"

Please check back in the near future for more information...

Peter Sanders - Artistic Director


CVCMF 2018 - Vaughan Williams Piano Quintet in c - 1st movement



The Lowe Down: A tale of two chamber music festivals

RANDOLPH - Last weekend, two of Vermont's most important chamber music festivals ended their seasons with programs that couldn't have been more different. Yet the two have the important things - particularly values - in common.

Randolph's Central Vermont Chamber Music Festival closed its 26th season Aug. 25 at Chandler Music Hall with a very traditional program of Beethoven, Dvorak and stretching it a bit with Gideon Klein (1919-1945). But its brilliant and rich performance of Dvorak's Piano Quartet No. 2 in E-flat Major, Op. 87, is the reason most people go to chamber music concerts.

Conversely, Lake Champlain Chamber Music Festival celebrated its 10th year with a co-premiere (a co-commission with three other festivals) of a brilliant work by resident composer David Ludwig at the Elley-Long Center in Colchester. "Paganiniana," named for the work of the same name by legendary violinist Nathan Milstein, is a dramatic concerto for solo violin and chamber ensemble (piano, flute, clarinet, violin, cello and percussion).

The roughly 18-minute work is based on a survey of Niccolà Paganini's (1782-1840) ferociously virtuosic 24 Caprices, Op. 1 for solo violin, which aptly describes the solo part in Ludwig's mini-concerto. Festival founder and co-artistic director Soovin Kim was the able soloist, delivering the Paganini paraphrases and "modernizations" with panache.

Punctuating was the klezmer-flavored ensemble that added the varying and sometimes jazz-flavored theatrical element, contrasting Kim's turns of virtuosity and more ethereal solos. Although some of the solo parts seemed a bit long, the concerto proved a crowd pleaser - with real substance.

Randolph's Dvorak performance had its own crowd-pleasing drama. The performance was flavored by the extraordinary violinist Arturo Delmoni, concertmaster of the New York City Ballet. The venerable violinist played with a now seldom-heard warmth and overt expressiveness, showing the decades of experience that gave the work its irresistible joy of music making. (Vermont's Jaime Laredo represents a similar style, heard last year leading a Brahms sextet at the Colchester festival.)

Delmoni was joined by fellow NYC Ballet musicians, violist Katarzyna Breila-Weiss and cellist Peter Sanders, festival founder and director, and New York pianist Adrienne Kim. The performance was expert and rewarding, particularly the heart-wrenching cello solos in the Lento, played by Sanders in memory of his father, a Columbia University music professor who died earlier this year at 99. The same performance qualities applied to the remainder of the program, Beethoven's "Kakadu" Variations, Op. 121A for piano trio and Klein's spicy 1944 String Trio.

The Lake Champlain concert opened with the original "Paganinia Variations," a fantasy-medley in which Milstein makes Paganini Caprices and Concerto No. 1 even more difficult. Violinist Bella Hristova, Ludwig's wife, performed with a beautiful virtuosity, refined with finesse, yet exciting.

Paganini remained the theme as pianists Gloria Chien, festival co-artistic director with her husband Kim, and renowned Canadian pianist Marc-André Hamelin performed with flair Witold Lutoslawski's 1941 Variations on a Theme by Paganini (the ubiquitous Caprice No. 24). They both also joined in the festival's substantial finale, a spirited, colorful and virtuosic performance of the two-piano version of Igor Stravinsky's 1913 "Rite of Spring."

Other than programming, the other big difference is size and scope. Central Vermont serves a small community, tiny Randolph and environs, yet it offers education opportunities, open rehearsals, work with and for kids. It has become a rite of summer for the Randolph area.

Set in Vermont's most populous county, Lake Champlain draws on Burlington for its often sold out performances and cadre of supporters. The festival offers pass holders a weeklong immersion in its music with open rehearsals, master classes, discussions and much, much more. It is also the only festival I have attended in which most of the audience shows up for the pre-concert lecture. Amazing!

Both the Central Vermont Chamber Music Festival and Lake Champlain Chamber Music Festival have become integral parts of the Vermont music experience. Aren't we lucky?

Jim Lowe, Rutland Herald, VT - September 1, 2018
Copyright © 2018, Rutland Herald





Pulp Fiction performed Jeffrey Zeigler, Peter Sanders, Hannah Holman, Chris Finckel (Arrangement: Bernard Amrani) on August 15, 2015 at Chandler Music Hall
as part of the Central Vermont Chamber Music Festival.



Unless otherwise listed, our concerts take place at the Chandler Music Hall in Randolph, Vermont. Click here for a map to Chandler Music Hall.




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Click here to download a donation form and help support the CVCMF.

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"...Saturday's Central Vermont Chamber Festival concert Chandler Music Hall had me babbling by intermission. When Peter Sanders told his listeners from the stage that they don't know how lucky they are, he was dead right. Except that I think they do know how lucky they are. He's lucky, too."

- Peter Goodman, as appeared in the HERALD, Randolph, Vermont, August 27, 2009. (read the full review here)


Rehearsal, season #1 on Chandler stage - 1993 Adela Peña - violin, Aloysia Friedmann - viola, Peter Sanders - cello, Steven Masi - piano

"Stanziano delivered the dramatic washes of notes with clarity and virtuosity, while Delmoni and Sanders plied the dramatic lines with passion. They also responded to the subtle moments with sensitivity, making this a grand - and fun - performance."

"The Central Vermont Chamber Music Festival has become a welcome tradition in Randolph and the central Vermont area, and Saturday's impassioned high level illustrates just why."

"Chamber music festival opens with finesse, spirit. Just when you think you've heard enough chamber music for the summer, someone comes along and performs the Mozart Clarinet Quintet - beautifully, in this case - and the passion returns immediately."

- Jim Lowe: The Times Argus, VT



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